Volvo cars in Europe will have the ability to caution to each other about dangerous road conditions

Volvo cars in Europe will have the ability to caution to each other about dangerous road conditions

Volvo is taking technology that allowed some of its vehicles to communicate with each other about hazardous road conditions and expanding it across Europe in an effort to increase safety, the automaker announced Monday. Volvo first introduced its Hazard Light Alert and Slippery Road Alert system in 2016 on Volvo’s 90 Series cars. But it…

Volvo is taking innovation that enabled some of its cars to communicate with each other about harmful roadway conditions and expanding it across Europe in an effort to increase security, the car manufacturer revealed Monday.

Volvo initially presented its Risk Light Alert and Slippery Roadway Alert system in 2016 on Volvo’s 90 Series automobiles. But it was restricted to drivers in Sweden and Norway. Next week, Volvo will make the system available to drivers across Europe.

The system will be a basic feature on all 2020 model-year vehicles in Europe. The system can be retrofitted on select earlier designs as well, Volvo stated.

The vehicle-to-vehicle communication tech that allows the Hazard Light Alert and Slippery Road Alert system uses a cloud-based network to interact between cars. For example, when an equipped Volvo car turns on the danger light, a signal is sent to all nearby Volvo cars linked to the cloud service.

The slippery roadway alert works by anonymously collecting roadway surface area information from automobiles further ahead on the road and cautioning chauffeurs approaching a slippery roadway section beforehand.

” Sharing real-time safety data in between cars can help avoid accidents,” Malin Ekholm, head of Volvo Cars Safety Centre said in a declaration. “Volvo owners directly add to making roads more secure for other motorists that make it possible for the feature, while they likewise gain from early warnings to possibly dangerous conditions ahead.”

The expansion of the system is the current in a series of efforts by Volvo to improve safety within its portfolio and across the industry. Volvo stated, as part of its statement, that it has opened a main digital library of all of its previous security research, going back to the 1970 s.

Volvo Cars repeated its call to the rest of the cars and truck market to join it in sharing anonymized data related to traffic safety across automobile brands.

Earlier this year, Volvo stated it would limit speeds on all brand-new lorries, beginning with its 2020 models, to about 111 miles per hour.

It also plans to incorporate motorist monitoring systems into its next-gen, SPA2-based automobiles beginning in the early 2020 s. That system will be able to take action if the driver is sidetracked or intoxicated. The electronic camera and other sensing units will keep track of the driver and will intervene if a clearly intoxicated or sidetracked chauffeur does not react to caution signals and is risking an accident involving major injury or death. Under this scenario, Volvo could restrict the automobile’s speed, call the Volvo on Call service on behalf of the driver or trigger the automobile to slow down and park itself on the roadside.

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