How Kubernetes came to rule the world

How Kubernetes came to rule the world

Open source has become the de facto standard for building the software that underpins the complex infrastructure that runs everything from your favorite mobile apps to your company’s barely usable expense tool. Over the course of the last few years, a lot of new software is being deployed on top of Kubernetes, the tool for…

Open source has become the de facto standard for building the software application that underpins the complex facilities that runs whatever from your preferred mobile apps to your business’s barely usable cost tool. Throughout the last few years, a lot of new software application is being released on top of Kubernetes, the tool for managing large server clusters running containers that Google open-sourced five years earlier.

Today, Kubernetes is the fastest growing open-source job, and earlier this month, the bi-annual KubeCon CloudNativeCon conference drew in nearly 8,000 developers to sunny Barcelona, Spain, making the occasion the biggest open-source conference in Europe yet.

To discuss how Kubernetes came to be, I took a seat with Craig McLuckie, among the co-founders of Kubernetes at Google (who then went on to his own startup, Heptio, which he sold to VMware); Tim Hockin, another Googler who was an early member on the job and was likewise on Google’s Borg team; and Gabe Monroy, who co-founded Deis, one of the first effective Kubernetes start-ups, and then sold it to Microsoft, where he is now the lead PM for Azure Container Compute (and often the public face of Microsoft’s efforts in this area).

Google’s cloud and the increase of containers

To set the stage a bit, it deserves keeping in mind where Google Cloud and container management were five years ago.

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